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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 10, 2019
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linkhajekj.net

The way storage is designed for Azure App Service is very interesting. Unlike with Heroku (or other similar providers), App Service offers a shared, persistent storage for your application. This generally means, that when one instance in a farm makes a write to the file system (D:\home) it will be available for all the other instances in the farm and it is going to persist even if the farm restarts or recycles.

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 10, 2019
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linkhajekj.net

One of the questions you may have is “Why do you say it is important when there is Azure Container Service?” The answer to that is very simple and very straightforward: Take the power of App Service on Windows with all of its services (scalability, custom domains, continuous integration, …) and leverage its power with your custom environment thanks to Docker.

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 10, 2019
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linkhajekj.net

So while the benefits of using Single Sign On are obvious and there many articles about it, it way less discussed topic is Single Sign Out – the process of signing out the user from all web application which use the same IdP.

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 10, 2019
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linkhajekj.net

The initial problem with App Service is its slow filesystem (which I have blogged about already more than once). Up until this discovery you had two options – either have all the files delivered through the slow replicated filesystem or enable Local Cache which results in the files written locally no longer being persistent which is a major issue with most PHP applications (even for full WordPress functionality – installing plugins, updates, etc.). Now, there is a third option ...

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 03, 2019
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linkgithub.com

You can find a chart demonstrating the paths that you can take and the libraries that you would want to learn to become an ASP.NET Core developer. This chart as a tip for everyone who asks me, "What should I learn next as an ASP.NET Core developer?"

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 02, 2019
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linkdamienbod.com

This article shows two possible ways of getting user claims in an ASP.NET Core application which uses an IdentityServer4 service. Both ways have advantages and require setting different code configurations in both applications.

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 02, 2019
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linkaws.amazon.com

.NET Core 3.0 was recently released which brings in a host of new features and improvements. This release of .NET Core is called a “Current” release by the .NET team which means it will have a short lifecycle of support after the next release of .NET Core. The Lambda team’s policy is to support Long Term Support (LTS) versions of runtime so .NET Core 3.0 will not be natively supported on AWS Lambda.

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 02, 2019
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linkblog.codingmilitia.com

we’ll use xUnit and write some unit tests for the ProxiedApiRouteEndpointLookup we’ve played around with in the last episode. We’re not going into much complexity, if for nothing else, because the class we’ll be testing is rather simple. In future episodes, with more complex code to test, we’ll revisit the topic and look at some other testing possibilities/needs (e.g. mocking).

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 02, 2019
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linkaws.amazon.com

Real world Microsoft workloads have a lot of Web APIs that are native to Microsoft methods for serving front-end applications (like ASP.NET, ASP.NET Razor/MVC, ReactJS or Angular Application). Even though there are customers who want to try serverless with AWS Lambda, they often have to continue to maintain many existing .NET web APIs. These applications traditionally talk to Microsoft SQL Server database for CRUD operations. This blog is for application teams that are migrating from traditional

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Bharat Dwarkani

Nov 02, 2019
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linkalejof.dev

Deploying a simple aspnet Core 3.0 app using DockerHub and Azure

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